This piece is long, but it's an interesting discussion on why print continues to stick around. Experts are beginning to think it's not just inertia but the fact that it appears to engage different parts of our brains than reading on a screen.

A 2004 study found that students more fully remembered what they'd read on paper. Those results were echoed by an experiment that looked specifically at e-books, and another by psychologist Erik Wästlund at Sweden's Karlstad University, who found that students learned better when reading from paper.

Wästlund followed up that study with one designed to investigate screen reading dynamics in more detail. He presented students with a variety of on-screen document formats. The most influential factor, he found, was whether they could see pages in their entirety. When they had to scroll, their performance suffered.

According to Wästlund, scrolling had two impacts, the most basic being distraction. Even the slight effort required to drag a mouse or swipe a finger requires a small but significant investment of attention, one that's higher than flipping a page. Text flowing up and down a page also disrupts a reader's visual attention, forcing eyes to search for a new starting point and re-focus.

It's worth the read—though you'll need to scroll.